Tag Archive: Nanaimo

The Solo Traveller’s Guide to Nanaimo: Say What?

Nanaimo, British Columbia, isn’t a typical destination for solo travelers. It’s a small city on the eastern coast of Vancouver Island. So you might ask why I’d write a guide for it. The answer is that I spent three days in Vancouver before taking a ferry to Nanaimo, and Vancouver and I just didn’t click. I wasn’t sure what to do or where to go, despite reading travel tips, so I don’t have much of a guide to write. In short: I wandered all over downtown, went to Stanley Park (beautiful), the aquarium (cool but pricey at $34 for adult admission) and Granville Island (a large market with food stalls and shops). I also explored West Vancouver and the delicious Savary Island Pie Company at 15th and Marina — if you go, try the lemon-buttermilk pie!

Then I caught the ferry to Nanaimo. I wondered if I should have gone directly to Tofino on the west coast of Vancouver Island instead, because everyone I met raved about Tofino.

But I loved Nanaimo. I’d read lackluster reviews of the city online before arriving and thought I’d probably spend most of the time inside, reading and writing and waiting to go north. Instead, I spent time with the hotel window thrown wide open, letting the sea air in, and wandering the harbor side, feeling wavelets lift the docks.

On the Water

On the first day, I took a ferry to Protection Island for lunch at a floating pub, but decided to take a walk around the island first. I found a residential enclave of houses and roads, feeling entirely safe despite its utter isolation with no help available on short notice. I wandered down to the beach on a trail that turned out to be someone’s private property, despite the markings on my map, and had a near run-in with a small fierce dog before its owner came out and invited me on to the porch. We shared stories, looked for eagles, and then she walked me to the wooded trail that led to another beach. I felt half like I was in a children’s book, half like I was in a fairy tale, and a little lost and found.

When I got to the Dinghy Dock Pub I was thirsty and downed a cider and two large glasses of water while enjoying yam fries and clam chowder, then took the ferry back to Vancouver Island.

Wind and Music in the Air

The next day was windy and warm; in fact, wind howled around my hotel room almost constantly. I was unable to figure out exactly where the sound came from, though I heard it through a vent above the foyer and saw the curtains blowing in the air when it was loudest.

At first I relaxed in the morning, listening to the wind and the sound of bagpipes that went on for hours. When I finally went downstairs to ask where the musician was, the doorman pointed me to a dockside plaza with two cannons on it. He said they play every day and then fire the cannon at noon. I walked to the plaza and watched for a few more minutes until the cannon fired, then explored the old Bastion and walked along the dock, enjoying the unusually warm weather and the sea birds that were everywhere, soaring and swooping and landing on piers and posts. A crow followed me from a dock all the way down a path toward the Newcastle Island Ferry, which I found I’d missed by one minute, so I returned to the main street and then had lunch.

Food and Gratitude

In my wanderings, I found a chocolate shop called Cherub Chocolate that surpassed anything I found in Vancouver. I enjoyed the rosemary caramel, spiced ginger and passion fruit chocolates most. I also found a good breakfast cafe, Mon Petit Choux, and an organic juice bar called Power House Living Foods.

I’m grateful for the opportunity to spend time here, and the unexpected surprise of a town with an interesting history and a little bit of magic near the edge of Canada. My biggest tip would be: If you go, stay downtown.

Next up: I go north.

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