Tag Archive: sabbatical

Sabbatical Phase 2: Coworking and Bootstrapping

As I gear up for Phase Two of my adventures, I feel pulled in different directions. My primary goal is to make things that are helpful, useful improvements to the world. I’m conflicted about how and where to do it, specifically whether to try coworking, and how to bootstrap/fund until those things either succeed or fail.

Dilemma 1: Where to Work

On coworking, I’m an introvert. I enjoy meeting people, but a day in a noisy space leaves me needing to rest and recharge. I do my best work in focused, productive bursts, either alone or with a small team of people. (I’m also good at political wrangling and large meetings, but that skill is less useful for my current activities, at least right now.)

I’m not sure I see the benefit of paying money to sit in a noisy space that saps my concentration and energy.

Fortunately, I have alternatives. On Thursdays and weekends, I can visit the Hacker School space. This space is special: It manages to be quiet and focused for much of the day even while full of people, which astonishes me but also makes me extraordinarily grateful. As a bonus, it’s a great place to find lunch or dinner partners for non-work breaks.

Tomorrow, I’ll be trying free space donated by an incubator for Hacker School alums to continue working on cool projects. I love this idea and look forward to seeing how it goes, especially because it requires one-day-at-a-time sign-up rather than an ongoing five-day-a-week commitment.

About the only thing I don’t gain from these spaces is a permanent “home” for my work. What I would pay for is a service that provides office trappings without actually being an office. Things like a non-P.O.-box mailing address, faxing, copying and printing, supplies like envelopes and a receptionist and phone numbers (which I could forward to my cell phone), with conference rooms rentable by the hour for meetings. But no work desks — I could take care of that part by going to quiet-ish coffeeshops or working from home, wherever home is.

Does anyone know of a service like this?

Dilemma 2: How to Bootstrap/Fund

On the bootstrapping/funding side, I could continue without focusing on money at all — and it’s been a blessing to do that for the past six months at Hacker School and while traveling — but I feel like that might be short-sighted. I can extend my options if I earn money by freelancing, consulting, investing, fundraising or seeking fellowships.

One thing I don’t want to do is become too focused on making money at the expense of actually doing things and making things. So I’ll need to find the right balance, and that will be a process of trial and error. Ideally, some of the things I do and make will become sources of income and possibly allow me to raise funds or get fellowships. But I don’t want to force an outcome; I want to experiment, make useful things, and see what sticks.

I suppose I have a sabbatical bucket list. If I do a self-check, I’ve done some interesting things so far (though not all of the things on this list). Travel to places I’ve never been. Attend Hacker School. Make YouTube videos. Write a blog. Write an eBook. Make apps and plugins. Make websites. Make training courses. Be an e-tutor. Speak up on Twitter. Present at conferences and meetups. Attend different types of conferences. Try crowdfunding. Make or contribute to some real-world products.

This list sometimes makes me feel disorganized or scattered. But if I think about my mission statement, it’s pretty clear:

Experiment, make useful things, see what sticks. Keep doing the things that stick. Be myself and see what happens.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Re-Entry

Re-entry is hard.

I landed in New York on Thursday, back from Vienna, zero jet-lag and raring to go. Dropped back into my New York life with a swish like a basketball in a net from halfway across a stadium.

Spent a weekend in upstate, enjoying the woods and hills, then booted up the computer Monday and thought, now what?

Now everything. Now I do everything I think of, for the next few months, to see what sticks and what I enjoy and what I will discard and how Phase Two of my sabbatical/adventure will play out.

Phase One was exploratory and learning-focused. Phase Two will be doing-focused. Phase Three will be I-don’t-know-what. More traveling? More doing? More of both?

I was jet-lagged after all. I kept falling asleep at 7:30. I caught a cold too, which blurred my brain-waves and had me huddled in the office room in my aunt’s house earlier this week, cradling tea and listening to the rain. Learning HTML5, which is easy but easily overlooked so I decided to get it done. Catching up again on Sam Altman’s startup class. Finishing my Venture Deals class.

Finishing the initial-learning part of this journey is scary, because I love learning and at the same time I use it as a crutch to keep me from doing things. If I only knew more. But I’ve learned that I only need to know the minimum possible to get it done at a point in time. Then I can learn more, and improve, and iterate.

I can learn more later. I’ll always be learning more. But I need to start to do more, interspersed with learning, and pair the two like a gas pedal and a brake in a car. Using only one or the other leads to a fiery crash or to going nowhere. Using the two together leads to anywhere a road can go.

The Traveller’s Guide to Budapest in 3 Days

Statue near Buda CastleBudapest is a mass of old buildings, made new again stone by stone, step by step, address by address.

Modern boutiques share space with old, abandoned mansions, boarded-up windows next to sleek glass.

Two cities face each other across the river, united and unique. Buda is a quiet town of rolling hills, castles and green spaces; Pest is a vibrant district of restaurants, traffic and shops. Bridges strung in lights connect the two across the Danube River.

I spent three days in Budapest last week and wish I’d spent ten. Here are tips to make the most of your journey, no matter how much time you spend there.

Tips for Travellers

Watch out for traffic and bikes. Cars will not necessarily stop for you if you jaywalk, and some intersections are extremely busy. Bike path signs are clearly painted on the sidewalk — pay attention to them! Not that I learned this from experience or anything…

Visit the Museum of Terror. More similar to a war memorial than a simple museum, the Museum of Terror occupies the former Nazi and Soviet intelligence service headquarters on Andrassy Street in Pest. The aim is to remind people what happened here and how it ended. One of the most effective museums I’ve ever visited — emotional, horrifying and informative. Afterward, walk down the street to Heroes Square, where statues of ancient Hungarian rulers stand guard.

Statues in Heroes Square

Statues in Heroes Square

Check out the schedule at the Hungarian State Opera house. I saw a matinee production of Falstaff, which was enjoyable and far less expensive than the Vienna State Opera. Good single seats were available one day prior, although the ballet at night was sold out. The opera house is old, gorgeous and majestic — worth seeing.

Eat breakfast at Gerloczy’s. Just behind City Hall is a small restaurant at a triangular intersection serving some of the best food in Budapest. Breakfast isn’t a big meal here, so it’s a real find. I had simple food: muesli with yogurt and an almond roll, which was hot from the oven and full of sweet almond paste. So delicious I returned the next morning too.

Get Hungarian forints and don’t rely on euros. I used a money exchange at a tourist information point and paid just over 2 euros in commission to change 50 euros, but that commission stays steady up to about 200 euros. Many businesses take only forints or credit cards, and if you want to use public transportation, you may need forints to buy tickets or passes.

Visit a spa. Because I was only in Budapest for three nights, I didn’t get around to visiting a spa, but if I return I’d love to try the Gellert Bath or Szechenyi Bath.

Where to Stay

Fisherman's Bastion in Buda

Fisherman’s Bastion in Buda, overlooking Pest

This decision depends on your personality. I stayed at the St. George Hotel near Buda Castle because I got a great price on Booking.com. It was beautiful, near Matthias Church and the Fisherman’s Bastion overlooking the entire city. All of the rooms are actually suites, with a living/dining room, kitchenette, bathroom and bedroom. Furnishings are antique-style and gorgeous. In the morning, the number 16 bus (not the 16A) took me directly to the center of Pest within 15 minutes.

If you’d rather stay in the center of nightlife and action, Pest is more suitable. To avoid ending up somewhere loud, check out the reviews and neighborhood online before booking. One promising option is the Gerloczy Rooms de Lux, above Gerloczy’s restaurant. I picked up a brochure while eating breakfast, and the rooms look beautiful. It also has 5 stars on TripAdvisor.

If you’re more inclined toward Airbnb, there are some fantastic, affordable places on offer. Because I was only staying for three nights, I went with a hotel, but I’d love to return for a longer stretch of time and rent an Airbnb.

Getting to Budapest

There’s an airport for travellers arriving from a distance, but getting to Budapest by rail is easy from Vienna, and that’s what I did. The Austrian OEBB train service runs every two hours from Vienna Wien Meidling station to Budapest Keleti station. The trip takes three hours, and the train travels through flat farmland (it’s not an alpine train).

Interestingly, I found a flexible fare that was cheaper than the restricted-schedule fare, so don’t assume the “SparSchiene” tickets are always cheaper.

If you want to reserve specific seats on the train, you’ll need a 6-euro reservation, sold alongside the basic train ticket, although these trains are rarely sold out.

Traveling within Budapest

Budapest has an excellent public transit system, and a map of the main tram and bus lines is available, although I couldn’t find a full bus map. The best option for me was to buy a 24-hour transit card that allowed unlimited trips on all trams and buses. It cost less than 2000 Hungarian forints (about 6 euros). If I’d known about this card’s existence sooner, I’d have gotten the 48-hour card instead of paying for some individual bus trips.

Taxis tend to be relatively expensive but are useful for late-night trips or for transport to and from the train station or airport.

The Vibe

I loved Budapest. It was beautiful, modern, evolving and dynamic, with great food and the sense of a city on the rise. Since leaving, I’ve been thinking about returning to continue sightseeing and settle into the rhythm of the city, as I did during my 10 days in Florence.

I’ve also read about the city’s nascent startup culture and would love to meet some of the entrepreneurs who are making Budapest their base. With its combination of affordability, things to do, beautiful scenery and good Internet (much better than in Florence or Tuscany), Budapest’s momentum is promising, and it’s simply a great place to visit and explore.

One Brick at a Time – Peace

I had no Internet connectivity when I wrote this post and the prior one, so I’m posting them now. This one is from Sunday:

A peaceful Tuscan hillscape at the farmhouseI wake up in the quiet. I’m getting used to it.

I open the window and smell wood smoke, leaves and sharp, clear air. If clean has a smell, this is it.

I boot up the computer. Still no Internet. It annoys me but less than it did last week.

I open TextEdit and start to write. Yesterday I read a book I bought two years ago. With no Internet, I’m plowing through my accumulated Kindle books.

The mountain view through the bathroom window is hazy blue, with low clouds filling the valley.

I hear other people in the house stirring, in other apartments. In my apartment there is peace.

I make the bed, smoothing the duvet so it looks welcoming again.

I start water for tea, steaming hot in the cool air.

I leave my socks off so I feel the brick floor rough under my feet. I like feeling each step as I take it.

An Island in Tuscany – Solitude

Saturday:

Tuscany viewI feel like a girl on an island, except the island is a hill in Tuscany.

I go outside at night and listen to the leaves rustle. Wild boars grunt in the olive groves. A pile of wood next to the house stands fallow until winter. A cool breeze slips sharp through my sweater.

Listening to the world is an experience I welcome in life.

Sleeping in pitch dark, in the quiet of the old farmhouse, terrified me at first but now is welcoming.

I no longer leave the light on at night.

I dream of strange things that I can’t remember in the morning.

I watch the leaves turn from green to gold over the hills surrounding the farmhouse. I eat the fruit from the garden and find I can cook well after all. I learn because I have to learn.

I deal with slow Internet and procrastination and cabin fever and self-doubt. I try to move enough every day that I do not become totally sedentary.

I am stranded. I am frustrated. But I am also happy.

Embarking Now

I resigned from my job April 29. I loved it for many years, but I needed something new and different.

My last day was yesterday.

Today I woke up at 8am and lounged in PJs. Same routine as every Saturday.

Except it wasn’t the same. I created a Flickr account for posting photos from travels to new places. I created this blog to document my journey toward a new purpose and pursuits. I read a Kindle book from my queue, The Quantum Doctor.

I realized I can do whatever I want. And this freedom-to-act won’t end on Tuesday, when I’d usually go back to work. It’ll only ramp up from there. But it’s up to me to keep it going. So:

  1. A good routine will be key. I’ll keep waking up early, at 7 or 7:30am.
  2. Good health and nutrition are non-negotiable. I need to get back on track here.
  3. Tackling the hard tasks will be a priority. Easy tasks can wait.

My major goals for this week are to register and study for the NASM personal trainer test, work on my NASM flashcard app, and blog at least three times.

It feels weird but incredibly great to be in this place of open road. It’s not the road I imagined two years ago, but sometimes to go forward, it’s necessary to do something different and unexpected for a while.

I don’t know what’s next. And that’s the great part.